Posts Tagged ‘Arizona Attorney’

ARIZONA DIVORCE LAWYER: FATHER’S RIGHTS IN ARIZONA CUSTODY CASES

Monday, July 16th, 2012

Submitted by Attorney Douglas Gardner

 

East Valley Divorce Attorney Discusses Father’s Rights in Divorce Cases

 

 

Arizona has moved forward in terms of Father’s rights recently, which changes how cases should be handled whether you are the Mother or the Father.

 

In the 1970s and 1980s, a typical custody order would have the children reside with the Mother, and Father would see the children on alternating weekends and two weeks during the summer.  As we moved into the 1990s and the 2000s, Father’s rights and Father’s role in raising children received significant attention from mental health professionals, which trickled its way into state laws and into the courtroom practices of judges.  Weekday parenting time to the Father became more common, and alternating holidays, equal sharing of summer and Christmas school recess became more common.

 

Over just the last two years, the Courts have moved beyond this, to much more often awarding equal parenting time when the parent’s live close enough to allow the children stability in school while residing with both parents. 

 

Moving to equal parenting time has its pros and cons.  Many children feel like they live at neither house, but “camp” at both houses and move back and forth.  Other children enjoy the significant relationship with both parents being much more involved.  Equal time parenting plans allow both parents to have their own time as well as parenting time, and can balance the various difficulties  in life including jobs and other responsibilities.  However, Equal time for many mother’s necessarily includes reduced parenting time. 

 

One difficulty often ran into is societal expectations.  While these changes are great for Father’s that want to be more involved, many mother’s feel that the Court has punished them because they are familiar with other families in which the Mother was named the primary parent, and they feel that they are as good or better of a parent than this other parent.  Such comparisons fail to account for the dramatic changes in the law over just the past few years. 

 

While many Father’s enjoy this additional time with their children, some Father’s realize that having the children 50% of the time causes them to be away from work more of the time, as schooling, sick children, and other issues are now falling on their parenting time 50% of the time. 

 

Equal parenting time is not appropriate in all cases.  I still see many cases in which Father or Mother can provide a better life style, stability, safe environment, and other factors and in which we can persuade the Court to award my client’s more than 50%/50% custody.  However, proving that such is the case requires a solid case and a well prepared trial plan. 

 

If you are experiencing legal issues involving custody or other difficult issues, whether as part of a divorce, after the divorce has already been entered, or a custody battle in which the parents were never married, you should have experienced legal counsel on your side. Please call 800 899-2730 and ask to speak with attorney Douglas C. Gardner, or visit our website at yourarizonadivorcelawyer.com.

Calculating A “Ball-park” Child Support Amount.

Monday, July 9th, 2012

 

Submitted by Attorney Karl Scholes

 

I will often have my divorce, or post-decree, clients ask me, “How much child support will I be receiving/paying?” My normal answer to them is a resoundingly, lawyerly, “It depends.”

 

When they press me for a more specific response, I tell them, “Well, we just need to apply the Arizona Child Support Guidelines.” I then proceed to instruct them as to what the Guidelines specify.

 

However, when they push back even more, I tell them, “Oh, you are looking for a “ball-park” calculation. That I can get for you.”

 

The remainder of this article is an explanation on how to come to a “ball-park[1] ” child support calculation.

 

First, one should understand at least a little of the background about child support in Arizona. It is important to understand that Arizona law requires custodial and non-custodial parents to provide “reasonable support” for their minor children. A.R.S. §25-501(A). A parent’s child support obligation has priority over all other financial obligations of the parent. A.R.S. §25-501(C).

 

In addition, the court receives the authority to award child support under A.R.S. §25-320. This statute also makes it mandatory for the court to issue an order of child support as per the Arizona Child Support Guidelines, (unless the court finds that a deviation is necessary… which is a subject matter for another day.)

 

The Arizona Guidelines follow the Income Shares Model, which means that the total child support amount approximates the amount that would have been spent on the children if the parents and children were living together.  The guidelines involve numerous intricacies, and for a full application, one should consult an attorney – who is experienced in using the Arizona Child Support Guidelines – as to how the guidelines apply to each individual case.

 

Second, to get a “ball-park” child support calculation, one must be able to answer the following questions:

 

1.      What is the gross income of both parties? (Note, this issue sometimes becomes complicated, especially if one party is self-employed, has an income that is not easily ascertainable, or if one party is unemployed. Consult an attorney if there are any complications in your case.)

2.      What is the number and ages of minor children involved? (Note, if this factor is complicated, please consult a mental health professional before seeking the advise of an attorney.)

3.      What is the cost of medical/dental/vision insurance for the minor child(ren): The key to this factor is to find the cost for medical insurance for just the minor children. (Note, at times, this factor can be complicated as well. Please consult an attorney if there are any complications in your case.)

4.      What are the monthly childcare costs for the minor children?

5.      Are there any extra education expenses paid for the minor children?

6.      Are there any extraordinary (gifted or handicapped) expenses for the minor children?

7.      How many days, out of a year, will the non-custodial parent have with the minor children?

 

Third, the next step is to plug the numbers from the answers above into their corresponding areas in the Arizona child support calculator, which can be found here:

 

Fourth, once you have plugged in the numbers above into the calculator, it will dispense a number under the heading “Child Support Obligation to be paid by____________”. This is where you will have your “ball-park” child support number.

 

If there are complications in your child support case, or to get an exact child support calculation, contact a family law attorney who is experienced in using the Arizona Child Support Guidelines.

 

If you are in need of legal counsel and would like to speak with an experienced attorney, please call 800 899-2730  or visit our website at yourarizonadivorcelawyer.com. or www.davismiles.com


[1] While a “ball-park” calculation of child support may be important for purposes of settlement, or setting expectations, one should note that a full child support calculation should be done by an attorney who is experienced in using the Arizona Child Support Guidelines.  

 

 

A Financial Benefit to Paying Child Support

Monday, July 2nd, 2012

Submitted by Attorney Kirk Smith

 

There is a general discontent among those who must pay child support. The consensus among them is not that they are unwilling to financially support their children; but rather, that they seemingly overcompensate the primary physical custodian for the expenses of the children, as these expenses fall appreciably lower than the child support they owe. Notwithstanding this perceived inequity, there is some consultation for child support obligors, as their tax liabilities generally decrease due to paying child support.

 

When child support is calculated each parent will be obligated to pay a specific percentage of the total amount calculated. How this plays out typically is that the primary physical custodian will pay nothing directly to the non-custodial parent, but the non-custodial parent will pay a specified sum each month to the primary physical custodian. For the purpose of this discussion do not get caught up in the fact that the primary physical custodian typically pays nothing directly to the non-custodial parent despite being allocated a percentage of the child support obligation.

 

An example of how these percentages might be allocated is; the primary physical custodian would be obligated to pay 20% of the total amount of child support calculated and the non-custodial parent would be obligated to pay 80% of the total amount of the child support calculated.

 

The family law courts will use these percentages under Number 27 of the Appendix of Arizona Revised Statutes 25-320, to determine the allocation between the parties of the dependent tax benefit, for the years following the divorce or separation.

 

Number 27 of the Appendix of Arizona Revised Statutes 25-320 states;

 

All the federal and state tax exemptions applicable to the minor children shall be allocated between the parents as they agree, or, in the absence of their agreement, in a manner that allows each parent to claim allowable federal dependency exemptions proportionate to adjusted gross income…To implement this provision, the proportionate share of the combined adjusted gross income of both parents is rounded to the nearest fraction with a denominator no larger than 5 (i.e. 1/2, 1/3, 2/3, 1/4, 3/4, 1/5, 2/5, 3/5, 4/5).

 

Applying this statute to the above example, and assuming that the parties have only 1 child, the non-custodial parent would receive the dependent tax benefit 4 out of the next 5 years. Looking at the years following the divorce or separation, 80% of 5 years is four years. The percentage then used to determine each parent’s child support obligation is also used to determine who receives the dependent tax benefit each year.

 

Figuring out who receives the dependent tax benefit can become more complicated with multiple children between the parties, however, the aforementioned principles still apply. Child support obligors then can take a measure of solace that even though their finances will diminish due to their child support obligation; their finances typically increase when it comes to receiving their yearend tax refund. 

If you are in need of legal counsel and would like to speak with an experienced attorney, please call 800 899-2730  or visit our website at www.yourarizonadivorcelawyer.com. or www.davismiles.com

 

 

RELOCATION ISSUES

Tuesday, May 29th, 2012

Seasoned attorney, Ron Fineberg, addresses the issue of relocation and what Arizona law requires of parents. 

 

Q&A’s

 

Question:

Our divorce was final two years ago.  The father and I were granted joint custody of our two minor children with substantially equal parenting time (visitation).  Because of my job, I need to move to California.  What do I do if the father will not agree to allow the children to move with me?

 

 

 

Answer:

 

Under those circumstances, Arizona law requires that the parent who wishes to “relocate” with a child outside of the state, or more than one hundred miles within the state, must provide the other parent written notice by certified mail, return receipt requested, at least sixty days prior to the anticipated relocation.  If the non-moving parent opposes the relocation, that parent may petition the court to prevent relocation of the child.  The petition to prevent relocation must be filed within thirty days after the notice is made, otherwise the petition to prevent relocation may be granted to the non-moving parent only upon a showing of good cause. 

 

If the petition to prevent relocation is timely filed, it is then up to a judge to determine whether or not to allow the parent to relocate the child after considering the “best interests” of the child.  The burden of proving what is in the child’s best interest is on the parent seeking to relocate the child.  A.R.S. §25-408, 25-403(A) and ARFLP 91(E).

 

If you are in need of legal counsel and would like to speak with an experienced attorney, please call 800 899-2730  or visit our website at yourarizonadivorcelawyer.com. or www.davismiles.com 

HAPPY ANNIVERSARY DAVIS MILES MCGUIRE GARDNER

Wednesday, May 23rd, 2012

 A customer is the most important visitor on our premises; he is not dependent on us. We are dependent on him. He is not an interruption in our work. He is the purpose of it. He is not an outsider in our business. He is part of it. We are not doing him a favor by serving him. He is doing us a favor by giving us an opportunity to do so. Mahatma Gandhi 

This June marks our one-year anniversary of merging two strong law firms, Davis Miles and McGuire Gardner.

Choosing to merge was not a difficult decision when you consider the benefits our clients now have available to them. The objective was and is to provide a convenient spectrum of legal services while maintaining our high standards.

Davis Miles McGuire Gardner now has over 50 attorneys in 27 practices including, Arbitration, Bankruptcy, Commercial Collections Corporate/LLC, Criminal & DUI, Estate Planning, Family Law, Immigration, Intellectual Property, Litigation, Mergers & Acquisitions, Real Estate, Tax Law, Trusts & Estates/Planning, and more.

A vital business practice is monitoring and measuring our success and recognizing what areas we need to improve.  At Davis Miles McGuire Gardner we are pleased that our commitment to professional standards of conduct was recognized by Martindale-Hubbell’s who awarded us the highest ratings.  Another litmus test is other firms and peers. In a peer review we ranked at the highest level.

As a result of our continued efforts to meet and surpass our clients expectations, DAVIS MILES MCGUIRE GARDNER continues to serve as the provider law firm for LegalShield (PrePaid Legal). Legal Shield continues to provide outstanding legal counsel to their growing clientele in New Mexico and Arizona.

The merger of these two firms is only part of the process in creating an all-encompassing firm for our clients and their needs. We will continue to seek out the best attorneys who are equally dedicated to serving our clients with integrity, consideration and respect. 

If you are in need of legal counsel and would like to speak with an experienced attorney, please call 800 899-2730  or visit our website at yourarizonadivorcelawyer.com. or www.davismiles.com

 

 

TEMPE AND MESA ARIZONA DIVORCE AND FAMILY LAW LAWYER COMMENTS ON COMMON TAX ISSUES

Thursday, May 3rd, 2012

Arizona Divorce And Family Law Tax Issues Must Be Considered Year Around By Attorneys and Parties

In dealing with hundreds of divorce and family law cases, parties and even many lawyers often forget to include provisions regarding common tax treatment. These important financial issues should not be overlooked.  As the April tax deadline for 2011 is behind us, we must nonetheless continue to look at 2012 and future tax years in all settlement and trials.

The most common issues is the claiming of the children for tax exemptions.  Under the federal Internal Revenue Service (IRS) rules, the parent with whom the child resides the greater part of the year is entitled to claim the child as a general rule.  The Federal IRS rules do, however, allow for the State Court divorce judge to make a different allocation.  Under Arizona family law, the statute requires that in most cases the Judge must divide the claiming of the children proportionate to income.  As far as the IRS goes, this is taken care of by the use of form 8332 which can be found online or obtained through a tax preparer.

It is to the benefit of both parties to consider who will benefit most from the tax exemption.  In some cases in which one party will receive a substantially greater advantage than the other party, one party can be permitted to claim the child every year in exchange for an increase or decrease in child support.  This would be done by agreement of the parties and should be included in an Order signed by the Court.

Another common issue is whether to file jointly or separately.  It is often financially advantageous to file jointly, though in high conflict cases the difficulty in working together toward a common goal may outweigh the financial advantage.  The total tax return can be divided equally in some cases.  In other cases, it is more fair to calculate the two returns separately, and then determine how to split the incremental increase in the refund if the parties file jointly.  Talk with your tax preparer or CPA regarding filing jointly or separately, and work with your divorce or family law attorney to ensure that your agreement is written in such a way to maximize your tax benefit.

There are tax advantages to being able to file as the head of household.  Generally this can be claimed by the parent with the child the majority of the time.  If divorcing couples have more than one child, they may each be able to claim at least one child as the head of household.  This should be reviewed by your tax preparer or CPA, and worked through with your divorce and family law attorney.

In some cases, it may be advantageous to file single, rather than married filing separately.  Even if your divorce case has not concluded, there are specific rules that when applicable may allow a party to file a single.  These rules include maintaining a separate residence for all of the past six months of the taxable year, and maintaining over half of the cost of maintaining the home.  You should work through these issues with your tax preparer or CPA, and work with your divorce lawyer to ensure that any agreements or court orders permit you to file as you have been advised by your tax professional.

Because the tax issues can be complex, you should ensure that you work with an experienced family law attorney or divorce lawyer.  If you are involved in a divorce or custody case, and are looking for experienced representation involving tax issues or other complex issues, please call 800 899-2730 and ask to speak with attorney Douglas C. Gardner, or visit our website at yourarizonadivorcelawyer.com.

Arizona Attorney Discusses Jurisdiction Issues in Custody Cases

Thursday, April 21st, 2011

Under Arizona law, Arizona courts typically have jurisdiction over new divorce, custody, paternity, and other cases involving children so long as the child has resided in the state of Arizona for the 6 months preceding the commencement of the case. Once Arizona obtains jurisdiction, the courts will generally continue to have jurisdiction so long as either parent continues to reside in the state of Arizona.

If both parents have relocated out of the state, a new state may have jurisdiction. Occasionally the parties can consent to jurisdiction in another state. Courts in Arizona or other states can get involved on an emergency basis when necessary, even when that court or state would not have ongoing jurisdiction.

Most states have similar or identical laws regarding jurisdiction over custody issues.

If a case has been filed against you in Arizona, and you do not believe that Arizona has jurisdiction, an attorney with McGuire Gardner, PLLC can file a Motion to Dismiss the case for lack of jurisdiction. If you would like to file a case in Arizona and you are not certain if Arizona has jurisdiction over some or all of the pending issues, you should also speak with one of the family law attorneys with McGuire Gardner, PLLC. To contact an attorney with McGuire Gardner, PLLC to discuss your custody issues, you may call (480) 829-9081 or visit us online at yourarizonadivorcelawyer.com.

East Valley Family Law Lawyer Discusses Division Of Businesses In Divorce

Wednesday, April 6th, 2011

Arizona law requires the equitable division of community property and jointly owned property. Even in cases where the property is the sole and separate property of one spouse, the law in certain instances recognizes that the other spouse may have an equitable interest in the property for any increase in value attributed to the finances or effort of the marital community during the marriage. Generally, equitable division requires an equal division, though there are certain exceptions where an unequal division may be most equitable or fair.

In many divorce or legal separation cases, one or both parties own a business, medical practice, or other professional practice. Generally these businesses or practices were started and built during the marriage, though in some cases the business was started prior to the marriage and has increased in value during the marriage.

In each such case, both spouses have a legal and/or equitable interest in the business, and the value of the business must be equitably divided as part of the divorce case. Often, the business will need to be valuated or appraised. There are many issues that arise including the type of appraisal, the date of the appraisal, whether the appraisal includes the goodwill value of the business or only the tangible assets, etc.

These are complex cases, in which an experienced and knowledgeable attorney is imperative. If you are contemplating a divorce, or are already involved in a divorce, and you would like to speak with an attorney who has handled many complex divorce cases involving the division of businesses, please call McGuire Gardner today for a free initial telephonic consultation. Call us at (480) 829-9081, or visit us at YourArizonaDivorceLawyer.com.

Arizona Lawyer Discusses Effect of Wage Garnishment By Creditors When Child Support or Spousal Maintenance (Alimony) Is Paid

Wednesday, March 16th, 2011

In all dissolutions of marriage entered after January 1, 1988, and in any modifications of orders entered after that date, where child support payments are ordered, a wage assignment is automatically entered in favor of the person or agency entitled to receive the support payments. A.R.S. § 25-504(A).

In a proceeding in which spousal maintenance is ordered, the court may enter a wage assignment on either party’s request, but the wage assignment is not mandatory. Id.

Wage assignments issued pursuant to A.R.S. § 25-504, for either child support or spousal maintenance, have priority over all other attachments, executions, garnishments or assignments. A.R.S. §§ 12-1598.14(B) and 25-504(P).

Where a judgment debtor’s earnings become subject to more than one writ of garnishment, and of spousal and child support priority a judgment creditor recovers no nonexempt earnings for two consecutive paydays, the lien on earnings of such judgment creditor is invalid and of no force and effect, and the garnishee shall notify the judgment creditor accordingly. A.R.S. § 12-1598.14(C).

Garnishment limits for creditors (except for child support or spousal support) is up to 25% of a person’s gross wages. For child support and spousal support, the limit is up to 50% of a person’s gross wages.

In some cases, it may be advantageous to ensure that child support or spousal support is being paid by a wage assignment. Because of the priority for child support and spousal support wage garnishments, your income deduction will be going to support your children or ex spouse, which is generally preferable to the money going to a credit card company or other debt collector.

If you would like to discuss child support, spousal support, or other family law issues with an attorney, please call McGuire Gardner, PLLC at (800) 899-2730 or visit our website at YourArizonaDivorceLawyer.com.

Arizona Attorney Discusses Child Support and Spousal Maintenance Issues in Bankruptcy

Monday, March 7th, 2011

As a lawyer with many cases in Phoenix and Mesa, Arizona and throughout the state, I often encounter family law cases in which a bankruptcy has been or will be filed. Both parties need to understand what will happen with child support and spousal maintenance in a bankruptcy case.

First, from the point of view of the debtor or person filing bankruptcy in which case the debtor is obligated to pay child support or spousal support: bankruptcy will not discharge an obligation to pay child support or spousal maintenance. Bankruptcy can, in certain cases, discharge or eliminate other types of debts to a spouse or former spouse. However, child support and spousal support will need to be modified or terminated through the family law courts. If you have other debts to a spouse or former spouse which you want to eliminate in bankruptcy, you will need to hire an attorney that can answer your questions and help you through this difficult process. 

Second, still from the point of view of the debtor or person filing bankruptcy, but this time the debtor is receiving child support or spousal support: Your right to collect child support and spousal maintenance is not an asset that can be taken from you in bankruptcy. The income that you receive from actual payment of support will affect your bankruptcy, as more income may make it difficult to qualify to file for certain types of bankruptcy. You will need to ensure that your bankruptcy attorney is aware of any income you are receiving. You should also make sure that your divorce or family law attorney is aware of the status of any bankruptcy or of the potential that you will file for bankruptcy.

Third, from the point of view of the spouse or ex-spouse of a debtor, in which case the debtor is obligated to pay child support or spousal support to that spouse or ex-spouse: there is little to worry about a spouse or ex-spouse filing for bankruptcy as it pertains to child support and spousal support. These debts are not dischargeable in bankruptcy, meaning the debts will continue to be owed even after your spouse or ex-spouse completes bankruptcy. It may even be beneficial, as your spouse or ex-spouse will eliminate other debts and have more funds available to meet his or her obligations to you. Bankruptcy also gives child support and spousal maintenance a “priority,” meaning they will get paid before most other debts will get paid. However, if your spouse or ex-spouse owes you other money for property issues, or is obligated to pay debts that your name is also on, you will need to contact a bankruptcy attorney that is also familiar with divorce and family law issues to ensure that your rights are protected.

Finally, from the point of view of the spouse or ex-spouse of a debtor, and the spouse or ex-spouse is obligated to pay child support or spousal maintenance to the debtor: your spouse or ex-spouse’s decision to file for bankruptcy does not eliminate your ongoing obligation to pay support. The payments will continue to go to your spouse or ex-spouse, and will not be taken by the bankruptcy court or the bankruptcy trustee. If you need to modify or reduce your child support or spousal support, you will need to contact a family law attorney to assist you.

If you have any questions regarding bankruptcy or family law issues, please contact McGuire Gardner, PLLC by calling (480) 829-9081, or check us out on the web at www.mcguiregardner.com.