Posts Tagged ‘Confidentiality’

Finding The Right Attorney: Finding an Appropriately Balanced Attorney

Wednesday, January 2nd, 2013

Arizona Divorce Lawyer Discusses How To Find The Right Attorney

Submitted by Attorney Douglas C. Gardner

I have always found photos of the heavy built person with the bulldog on a leash next to the overly stylistic person with the overly dressed up French poodle to be hilarious.  People joke about other people finding dogs that most resemble them.  Throughout my law practice, I have often found that many clients seem to select lawyers who resemble themselves in many ways.  Specifically, people of low morals and ethics seem to be able to find attorneys with low morals and ethics.  Overly aggressive individuals seem to seek out attorneys who will be overly aggressive.

Such behavior can become quickly problematic, as it may be more advantageous to have an attorney who is appropriately balanced.  When I am representing clients in a divorce, I recognize and understand that my clients are normal people, but that they are going through what is most likely the most difficult time in their lives.  Generally clients in divorce cases are struggling financially (which usually occurs even before the divorce starts, and may be part of the cause).  Clients going through divorce cases have to juggle parenting duties that were historically divided between the other parent.  Clients going through divorce have strong emotions that they must work through including the hurt, betrayal, anger, etc.

I feel that when hired as a divorce attorney, my job is to recognize the emotion, but to not get pulled in or effected by the emotion.  I feel that as a divorce attorney I am the legal and logical “Jiminy Cricket” proverbially on my client’s shoulders whispering to them what the legal and logical choice would be and helping them see beyond their emotional choices.  Choices made during a divorce often have life-long lingering effects, and should be carefully considered from the emotional, legal, and logical perspectives before making any decision.

The problem with overly aggressive people seeking out overly aggressive attorneys, or less ethical people seeking out less ethical attorneys, is that instead of an advocate fighting to  help you understand what is best, you may hire a cheerleader that will simply encourage you to act out emotionally without considering the logical and legal ramifications.

Any divorce attorney who has handled more than a few cases has been “fired” by a client.  For me, it does not happen often, but does occur.  I have certainly been hired by many more clients who have fired prior attorneys than I have been fired from.  I have found it interesting that I am usually fired for one of two reasons:  1) being too nice, or 2) being too aggressive.  Whenever I have a client that indicates that he/she is not fully satisfied with my services, I explain to them how we can fix things to make it right, and I discuss with them that they have the option of representing themselves or hiring another attorney (within our firm or from another firm).  It is important for clients to have confidence in their chosen attorneys, so that clients trust the legal and logical advice given.  It is important for clients to have confidence in the strategy (for settlement and/or for trial) utilized by the attorney.

My general preference in any case is to come in nice, and to try and resolve cases amicably through settlement.  I have learned that when I come in too harsh and too strong that it may cause the case to go through litigation unnecessarily.  It is generally easier to get meaner and nastier as the case progresses than the other way around.  Some clients are looking for attorneys that will instantly be on the attack.  While there are certain cases where this is appropriate (such as an emergency cases where emergency orders are needed right away), in general, those attorneys who come on unnecessarily strong at the beginning of a case do so simply to ensure that the case costs much more than it would have otherwise needed to cost.

Even when taking the gloves off, it is important to have an attorney who remains ethical and professional at all times.

If you are involved in a divorce case or other parenting time case involving “legal decision making” (the new word for legal custody), or other simple or complex issues and want experienced legal representation, please call 800-899-2730 and ask to speak with Douglas C. Gardner, or visit our website at yourarizonadivorcelawyer.com.

TEMPE AND MESA ARIZONA DIVORCE AND FAMILY LAW LAWYER DISCUSSES IMPLICATIONS OF FACEBOOK IN FAMILY LAW CASES

Monday, August 27th, 2012

Submitted by Attorney Douglas C. Gardner

When involved in litigation, or even when there is the prospect of litigation, parties should be aware of certain aspects of Facebook, that they may not have ever considered before.

Two competing concepts need to be discussed, and the differences understood.  First, it is beneficial to parties likely to be involved in litigation to not create evidence that may be used against them, and this includes posting to Facebook.  We have all heard many times (hopefully only on T.V.) that we “have the right to remain silent, and that anything we say may be used against us in a court of law.”  Similarly, though not specifically stated when read our Miranda rights, you have the right to not post on Facebook anything that may be incriminating. 

Obviously inappropriate Facebook posts may include any indiscretions, adulterous situations, use of illegal drugs, abuse of alcohol, abuse of the children, etc.  However, even a seemingly harmless post that “I am in Colorado visiting Aunt Jane” may be used as evidence in a contempt case for leaving the state with the children during the pendency of a divorce case.  Be careful what you post.  If you have any hint that you may be involved in a divorce case in the near or even far future, remember that you have the right to remain silent on Facebook also. 

Once a divorce or other family law case has been filed, you cannot now simply close out your Facebook account.  Destroying, hiding, or otherwise disposing of evidence can be a serious crime and result in serious sanctions in your case.  This is often referred to as “spoliation of evidence.”  Once a case has been filed, it is too late to remove problematic posts.  Furthermore, Facebook does not delete your account when you ask to close out your account, as all of your entire Facebook file remains in the computers, and can be subpoenaed if and when needed. 

Even if you are not anticipating a divorce or legal battle, you should always monitor and pay attention to your security settings, limiting who has access to your profile on Facebook. 

If you are involved in a divorce case involving simple or complex issues and want experienced legal representation, please call 800-899-2730 and ask to speak with Douglas C. Gardner, or visit our website at yourarizonadivorcelawyer.com.

 

Strategic Reasons for Being Nice-Custody Determination

Friday, June 8th, 2012

 

Submitted by Attorney Kirk Smith

 

In many cases, parents divorcing, or parents who were not married but are now separating, will fight a merciless custody battle for their children. The extreme acrimony attendant with such battles, in my experience, can have a very real impact on the children of these divorces. Increased cooperation between the parents lessens this emotional impact, and by itself, should be sufficient incentive for most parents to “play nice” during the subsequent legal process.  

 

None the less is there a strategic reason for one parent to be gracious to the other, outside altruism, that benefits them in the court’s final custody determination?  

 

In most cases one parent will become the primary physical custodian of the children, meaning that that parent will have the children at their residence the majority of the time each week. There are specific statutory factors the family law court examines when determining who becomes the primary physical custodian of the children. See Generally A.R.S. §25-403. 

 

One of the factors the court looks at in determining who should receive primary physical custodianship is;

 

Which parent is more likely to allow the child frequent and meaningful continuing contact with the other parent. This paragraph does not apply if the court determines that a parent is acting in good faith to protect the child from witnessing an act of domestic violence or being a victim of domestic violence or child abuse.A.R.S. § 25-403 (6)

Of course in some cases the other parent is a real danger to the children therefore it is necessary to diminish that other parent’s time with the children or ask that it be supervised. More often then not, however, both parents are usually suitable to care for the children, and an attempt to completely eliminate the other parent’s time with the children will be seen by the court negatively. The parent trying to “thwart” the other parent’s visitation with the children then could seriously and detrimentally effect that parent’s  chance of becoming the primary physical custodian because that parent did not “allow the child frequent and meaningful continuing contact with the other parent.”

If you are in need of legal counsel and would like to speak with an experienced attorney, please call 800 899-2730  or visit our website at yourarizonadivorcelawyer.com. or www.davismiles.com

A rule of thumb, assuming that the other parent is not a danger to the children, is to allow and encourage the other parent’s time with the children. This does not mean that you must have a half time schedule with the other parent, nor does it mean that anytime the other parent asks for time it must be provided. What it does mean is that going to extremes by trying to eliminate the other parent’s access to the children without good cause, strategically speaking, can backfire and decrease your chances of gaining the final custody determination from the court you wish.

 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ARIZONA DIVORCE: WHAT YOU SHOULD DO IF A DIVORCE IS COMING

Friday, May 18th, 2012

Tempe Arizona Divorce Lawyer Discusses Steps That Should Be Taken To Protect Yourself If A Divorce or Legal Separation Is Coming

 

 

Under Arizona law, as soon as the divorce case is filed and served upon the other person, and both parties are aware of the existence of the case, the Preliminary Injunction provides each party with certain protections such as preventing the other party from absconding with the children or assets. 

 

However, even before a case is filed, there are certain steps that should be taken to protect one’s self and to ensure that information remains available and obtainable.

 

As soon as you believe you will be going through a divorce, make sure you change your passwords to your computer, email accounts, blogs, cell phones, etc.  While some of the information on your electronic devices may need to be disclosed and provided, you will need to ensure that you have sole access to these lines of communication.  You want to ensure that if your attorney sends you attorney/client privileged communications by e-mail that only you will have access to these communications.

 

You should also ensure that you have safely written down the account numbers, account balances, and the name and address of any financial institution or retirement company with which you or your spouse have accounts.  This information can occasionally disappear once the divorce is filed, and while your attorney may be able to subpoena or otherwise obtain this information, this comes at a cost. 

 

You should also make a list of any valuable property that you brought into the marriage, or that you have received as a gift or as an inheritance.  Under Arizona law, these are likely to be determined to be your sole and separate property. 

 

You should make a separate list or inventory of every item of personal property that you and your spouse own.  This can be done with a video camera walking room to room and panning across each room to show the furniture and appliances in each room, or can be done by a spreadsheet or otherwise.  If for some reason you are unable to return to the marital home, you will want to have already completed this list ahead of time.

 

Finally, you will want to find a trusted friend or family member, with whom you can store this information and copies of any important documents that you do not want to disappear or become lost. 

 

If you are considering a divorce or legal separation, and would like to speak with an experienced family law attorney about your rights, responsibilities, and ways to protect yourself in your upcoming divorce, please call 800 899-2730 and ask to speak with attorney Douglas C. Gardner, or visit our website at yourarizonadivorcelawyer.com.